Yes I still exist (honest guv’)

Imagine my surprise when I realised I hadn’t written a blog post since the end of last year! Lawks! I’ve been writing drafts when I can but poor ole Betsy the laptop has usually (always) got too many browser tabs open to cope that well! How is it possible that time passes by so quickly these days?!

I have been posting on the Facebook page though of course. Just never seemed to get to complete a blog post. The main reason has been lack of Brain. It pops in now and again but it doesn’t hang around as long as it used to. So I realise I need to change my way of writing to accommodate this change because mostly it’s resulted in me not writing. And as writing has become a love of mine I have been getting twitchy!

As I’m in the UK I was initially dealing with the tail-end of the continuing coldness through the Winter. Always a toughie getting through to the Spring, eh? Pain levels are up, natural vitamin D intake is down, relentlessness is the name of the game and by the end of Winter (well deserving of it’s capital W) we are begging and pleading the weather to bring Spring to us so that we can start recovering.

Winter was actually pretty mild here, but that just means that I wasn’t at quite such an extreme of my wits end, y’know? Winter is *always* hard. Springtime rocks!

I’ve been having some more health issues and I’ll write more about that in due course, but initially it appeared like it was a crazy-arsed allergic reaction to anything / nothing / everything which lasted all the time / 4 random minutes at a time / stopped for a few hours then came back with a vengeance. It was pretty weird. And yes it became apparent that it was so bizarre that it was reminiscent of my respiration issues a few years ago, so I knew it was a systemic overload which had to be stopped. Hence.. more on that in a separate post.

In March I said “yes” to a concert because I figured how could I not? I mean, it was in Winchester Cathedral, maaan! Beautiful! I didn’t realise just how cold it would get in there or that I should’ve dressed for the outdoors to better manage my pain levels, but fortunately they had some doghouse sized radiators to cuddle up to! So yeah, I went and saw Anathema perform acoustically in a gorgeous cathedral. It was stunning. Truly fabulous.

There are a few cathedrals around the UK who raise some of their funds through events like this so if you get the chance… dress warm, take a cushion if you need one, and because it’s acoustic it’s not like you’re gonna get your head blown off by mega-speakers so the volume is more compatible with sensitive ears (though if you’re unsure I can recommend the noise-reduction earplugs as they reduce the volume without muffling the sound).

Winchester Cathedral acoustic concert, Anathema

How stunning is this?!

 

I’ve also had the wonderful experience of two fellow CRPSers travelling from their home countries to come and visit me in real-live-3D, wow! That will also be a separate post because it was so fabulous 😀

Two of my friends got married and Magic Dude and I attended the sci-fi wedding in Star Wars fancy dress. Which I made with my own fair hands, I might add! My sewing machine and I are no longer nemeses, we have made friends and now I wish I had more time during which I am more functional to make some clothes. I now have a new creative project with the sewing machine which I’ll post about soon, too.

And for anyone wondering… I am dressed as Jareal (after the make-up has come off and been re-applied a gazillion times X-) ) who I found out about by researching the comic characters, and Magic Dude is dressed as Plo Koon who was briefly in one of the prequels (very briefly – when asked about his choice of wedding costume he said something like “you see him in one of the spaceships for a moment and then he dies”).

And of course that same month we had the UK government election. Voters were at a loss who to opt for if they even voted at all, many didn’t. The ‘majority’ on our ‘first past the post’ system was a shock. The majority means the party who got the most votes, even though the people who voted for them are actually in the minority of the voting population. Even weirder, our system is set up for the main parties and to keep smaller parties at bay. So this means that votes for the Conservatives adds up to more MPs from their party than exactly the same number of votes would get for another party. I know. Don’t ask. It’s so out of date. Anyway the shock factor was massive. No-one expected the same government to be voted in again. Not even the government peeps themselves! Many of my disabled friends were in tears at the news – welfare cuts have been horrific here with the poorest and most vulnerable getting hit multiple times through different cuts. The new welfare ‘assessment’ process is causing mental health issues to the extent that there have been suicides as a result. Before getting re-elected the government promised a further £12billion welfare cuts so you can see why so many people were in tears. I seemed to last a while in shock until Magic Dude’s Dad said something blinkered and I burst into sobbing and couldn’t stop for some time. The UN is now running a second investigation into the state of human rights in the UK to expand on their earlier investigative report.

So yeah, now I’m an activist. As it turns out. Not just a health activist any more, but an activist for the poor and vulnerable generally. I can’t do much in my state of ill-health but there are petitions I can sign, ideas I can bounce, people I can help. Being chronically ill isn’t going to stop me from caring about others and doing what I can to help reduce the additional shitstorms coming their way. Takes up quite a bit of Brain Time of course, another reason I have been so absent from the blogging as usually May is the time of year when I would begin to manage to write a bit more.

So anyway that’s enough for the body to have to handle whilst still working through the months slowly recovering from Winter, right?

But I’ve also been doing my usual full-on overdoing it for one day in April and one day in June at Tai Chi tournaments. As you know it takes months for me to recover from Winter and weeks to recover from each tournament, so the overlap of tournament with Not Recovered From Winter Yet is substantial. But I do it because I am so limited and restricted every day that pushing myself for two days per year feels worth it because although the aftermath is horrific the memories last far longer. 🙂

The April tournament this year was not the usual nationals in Oxford but my first ever Europeans. (The Europeans were originally going to be held in Latvia and so this was a last minute alternative and much more viable for me to get to).

I performed the Sun Style 73 form which is not a flowery style so I have to show my understanding and skill levels in different subtle ways, so that was my challenge. I also performed the 42 form (a tournament form incorporating 5 different styles of Tai Chi) so performing two different things at one tournament was also my challenge. I was a bit awed that my teacher had put me in the advanced/open section whilst I am still officially at intermediate level, I guess that was also my challenge. Hey wait a minute? How many challenges am I fool enough to take on at once here?!

I was amazed that I ended up with a silver for my 42 form (with two lovely ladies from the Netherlands either side of me with gold and bronze) and a good score for my first ever tournament performance of Sun. But more fabulous was the fact that this was the first time that I’d been part of a larger team. We’ve only had a maximum of 3 of us there before, but this time we had a whole gaggle of us. Some in beginner, some in intermediate and some in the over 55s. Everybody in the team was supportive and encouraging to each other, and lots of fellow Tai Chi-ers there were positive towards us too. In fact I was so pleased to find out that my teacher had been told that her team were notable for their friendliness and positive attitudes. What a fabulous endorsement for her first event managing a larger team. 😀

Tai Chi, 2015, European silver

The next day I met up with my lovely teammate who also has chronic pain and was staying in the same hotel. We have travelled our Tai Chi paths alongside each other these past four-ish years and we have cheered on each other’s progression with such joy because it’s one heck of an achievement in the face of our respective health issues. I hobbled from bed to lift, and from lift to comfy chair in the hotel lobby. I sat in one chair with my feet up on a second, had my hot water bottle under my legs, blanket over the top, painkillers in my bag and he had been his usual sweetheart self and got the coffees before I got there. Several hours later we were still there nattering away. Movement was not very viable for either of us and it was great to be company for each other through the pain levels.

My lovely Magic Dude turned up later with the wheelchair so that he could get me out of the hotel room the following day. We went into Oxford town and I went camera crazy as I always do when I actually get out somewhere! It was really lovely to get to see the city this year. That wheelchair makes such a difference! 😀

Oxford, bicycles.jpg

Pictures obviously included bicycles (and many many grotesques and gargoyles on the old buildings)….

Oxford, Bodleian library

…the inspiration for Hogwarts main school hall in the films (Bodleian Library)…

Oxford, street pianist

…and a pianist on wheels who was super-prepared for any sudden change in the weather! Totally normal, nuthin to see here! (Actually his piano playing was gorgeous).

The weeks between the Europeans and the June Nationals whizzed by and I was not in great shape healthwise (starting the tournament day with the screaming ouchies in my left leg at a mean 8.5/10, boo!) but I managed to get the pain levels down a bit to perform in Sun Style at my intermediate level and got a good score considering I was racing through the 5-6 minute form to complete it within the required 4 minutes *and* I added in an extra move by accident, too! X-) Being able to get a decent score with Sun style was my aim. And extra wonderful was that my teammate (yes, that same friend) got the exact same score for his multiple-style 42 form and so we ended up on the podium together with joint silver, wow! I can’t tell you how awesome it felt to be standing there with my friend sharing that achievement after coming such a long way together in our journey to help our health situations. There really are no words to describe the singing glee in the soul but it was flipping wonderful! He’s put in phenomenal work to get where he is today using both physical and psychological tools to find the best pathway round the health stuff. If anyone deserved to be standing on that podium it was him, and I found myself standing on the same podium with him which felt so perfect that I wasn’t on a different podium or even a different level – we were on there together. Go Team!

I also entered the advanced/open section with the 42 form, managed to fluff it up in amazing style, made it look like it was meant to be that short honest guv’, and ended my performance somewhat (a lot) earlier than I should have, har! A good score considering the extent of my very silly error, and some wonderfully positive words from head judge Faye Yip telling me to come back next year because I have “potential”, yay!

Oh and no wonder my body has been so screwed because the classes that I use for physio’ include adaptive Kung Fu in which I have got my red sash and first level brown sash this year too. I’m not entirely sure how I managed to achieve those! Although the brown grading was during the heatwave and my legs were glad of it even if my nervous system wasn’t! My body needs more tiiiiiime, man!

And yet I posted on my personal Fbk wall the other day that it would be nice not to have to deal with people telling me that I am “lucky” to “not have to work” / “get to stay at home all day” because I get those sort of comments as a result of how people see me when I am out of the house i.e. looking ‘normal’ because I am doing my physio’. If only they could see me the rest of the day eh? Needing a wee and not being able to get to the loo in the adjacent room, wanting a cuppa and having to wait several hours til Magic Dude gets home and can make me one. Ah well, people just don’t get it eh?! 😛

And then we were getting the house ready to put up for sale. It sold at the end of July and we’ve been searching for our new home ever since. Not sure how much longer our buyers will hang in there but if they pull out it’ll sell straight away again. The market here at the moment for the main price bracket of £120-210k (your basic 2-3 bed homes with the usual squished space that we have in UK houses) is basically at about 15 buyers per house. Apparently we wouldn’t have the same extent of trouble if we had £210-250k. Oh if only eh?! Har, dream on!

We need some more space y’see. I moved into his one bedroom place and so nearly everything I own has been in the loft for the last 5 years. If one of us wants to do something creative there’s no space to set it up and leave it so most of my physio’ time is taken up with getting everything out and setting it up and then putting it all away again afterwards which doesn’t leave much time for whatever the activity in the middle was supposed to be (I want to get painting again). So yes we need a little more space but also….an enclosed garden. Currently we only have an open outdoor space between the house and the pavement out the front. Apart from how nice it would be to have some private space the main reason is (dahn-da-da-daaaaah…) we wanna get a dog! But the housing market is slowing down for chrimble so I’m expecting our buyers to pull out sometime soonish and that we’ll be re-selling in January when potential new homes start to show up in greater numbers.

So with fewer house viewings taking up my physio’s I finally have some time again, wheeee! Except for how that creative project I mentioned will now take over any available physio’ time. I look forward to sharing that when all the material has arrived. 🙂

Anyway, now you know I’m still here.

Phew! That was a heck of a catch-up!

Loves xx

Tai Chi physio’s, a gold medal, and being proud of our achievements

The weekend before last, on Saturday night, I went out…. *gasp*,… on my own…. *woah*,… and I spent the evening with Tai Chi-ers and kickboxers whilst sitting in…. a wine bar *ohmygoodnesswhatevernext?* and….(wait for iiiiit….)… I drank two small pots of tea…!

Dang, I sure know how to party! 😉

I can’t tell you how wonderful it is to meet people who take my disability in their stride. It’s not something that instantly makes sense as my disability is not apparent to the casual observer, but I’ve found that my teacher and classmates now spot when something’s not right. They clock my slackened facial muscles and my lack of twinkle in my eyes on a bad day. They don’t need the visual cues of me wielding my walking stick or going to sit on the floor to drink fluids to stop me from passing out. They spot it earlier than that these days. Tai Chi students in the West often begin learning it for health reasons, and as a result I have a teacher who’s used to working around health issues, and classmates with insight and understanding from their own experiences. I am not my disability, I am me, but my disability is something I have to constantly work around, so having people around who don’t bat an eyelid at continuing a conversation from floor level is pretty darn refreshing! 😀

I practice Tai Chi during my physio time when I can. Physio time also includes getting washed, dressed, fed, etc, so on bad days Tai Chi is a no-go. But with Magic Dude to make me dinner on days where I had to give up getting-food-time to be able go to a Tai Chi class for physio instead.. it’s viable. I have to make it viable because it’s crucial to my health.

I began learning it when I could no longer do my physio exercises at the gym (owing to good ole Dysautonomia tending me towards the whole throwing-up and passing-out thing!). It became my new form of physio. Instead of going to the gym twice a week to do physio exercises, I have instead been going to Tai Chi twice a week. It felt like a step down because I can no longer do any form of even sitting-down-cardio’, and that still bothers me healthwise, but if someone came along and magicked me healthy tomorrow I’d still continue with Tai Chi.

I entered the local interclub tournament last October. I’ve never been competitive with others. I always felt bad about winning anything because I didn’t want to hurt anyone’s feelings by accidentally doing better than them! I was nervous. By nature I seem to have always been apologetic, and competitions don’t come naturally to me! Living with a disability changed that somewhat, and maybe getting a bit older and a bit wiser too. I have a disability which affects every single aspect of my life, but I am still me, and when I compete it is in defiance of my condition. My motivation is not drawn from a basic competitive nature, or a wish to be the best, it is drawn from battling the CRPS. I agreed to enter a couple of tournaments because, well, why not? It turns out I’m not half bad, and every success is an in-your-face to my health! If I have a care assistant to drive me and look after me before and after (i.e. Magic Dude on his days off), then spending 4 minutes of physio time doing some Tai Chi in shiny pyjamas is actually viable!

Before the shiny pyjamas!

Before the shiny pyjamas!

I approach the Tai Chi the same way that I approached the studying… yes, I am disabled, I am limited and restricted, but I’m not going to let that stop me from seeing how far I can get. I have to approach things differently than I would if I was healthy. I can’t be active for long, and then I have to rest for hours to bring the pain and other symptoms back down again. Everything I do has to be flexibly based. The physio is crucial to my pain management however, so why not spend some physio time seeing what I can achieve? I have to live on the sofa with a blanket and a hot water bottle the majority of the time, but why should that stop me? When I can physio it’s good to do something useful but, if I can occasionally get to do something I actually enjoy then whooop!

To try to get me to realise that I’m not half bad at Tai Chi, my teacher had me enter a National tournament. It was two weekends ago. Magic Dude drove us all to the venue, and got me hot water bottles and drinks from the canteen there to keep me going. I was in the ladies beginners class. As far as I’m aware my competitors were able-bodied.

I won.

Ohmygosh, I won!

My teacher’s response was kinda along the ‘I told you so’ line! Awww

One of the few pic's that came out in the low lighting so of course it would be one where I'm facing the other way and have got my arms up like a zombie, hehe

One of the few pic’s that came out in the low lighting so of course it would be one where I’m facing the other way and have got my arms up like a zombie!

The dysautonomia kicked in just before I had to perform. The 5-6 minutes I was prepared for turned out to be a mere 4 minutes on the day, which meant having to speed things up and hit the right time marker without any practice. Eek! Fight or flight decided it was time to increase the heart rate, which (in me) results in light-headedness, dumbass brain, and all my limbs get shaky. I find that performance nerves are minimal owing to my need to focus on my condition, but the fight or flight response more than makes up for that! I went wrong and had to blag it into the correct move. I wobbled on one leg so I made sure I took my time so that I didn’t wobble on the other leg. I was way worse than I usually am in class. But I won! *glee* Take that CRPS and Dysautonomia… mwoohaaahaaahaaa!

That went on a note and into my jar of joy!

My Jar of Joy at the beginning of 2013

My Jar of Joy at the beginning of 2013

I juuuust about got myself mostly functioning by a week later to be able to join my Tai Chi teacher, the kickboxing teacher, and students of both disciplines in the nice-cup-of-tea (wine) bar. And though I couldn’t quite accept the “And here she is.. our Tai Chi champion” (every time they said “champion” I interjected “beginner” and then got told off for doing so! Self-deprecation is something I’m really good at!) I am actually really proud of myself. For going out on a limb and giving it a whirl. For doing it despite my health. In fact for doing it because of my health (both to help it and to stick my fingers up at my conditions)!

When I started writing this it was two days since the tea (wine) bar gathering. My pain levels were not as bad as I would have expected, even more surprising as I was on a really unhelpful chair regarding legs pain. I think that the happy dopamine effect of being out with real-live-3D people was doing wonders at combating the usually inevitable pain levels! But two days later and I was sat here with my breakfast and in my head was just one event from that evening. That of a kickboxer turning to their teacher and saying “Oh, are there Tai Chi-ers here as well as kickboxers, then?”. Which is a perfectly acceptable question. The problem was that in my obviously sober state I registered the tone of voice (kinda ‘ewwww’) and the facial expression to match.

I’ve worked so so hard to just get through each day with my health the way it is. I’ve had to downgrade my physio activity owing to health deterioration. I was fortunate to find a physio alternative which I love, which I’m not half bad at, and which is now setting me on a path of physio in-your-face-CRPS. I’m totally stoked. I don’t cap my potential. It’s called potential for a reason – it is unknown. So I aim high and see what happens. I’m used to being dismissed by some of the kickboxers, they often have no interest in Tai Chi and that’s fair enough. But the ‘ewwww’ face and tone of voice as the eyes flicked over to the two Tai Chi students really struck a chord. I did not let it bug me at the time. So why did it bug me two days later?

At the time I was high on dopamine and enjoying conversations with actual real in-the-flesh people who, as it turned out, I have a lot in common with regarding our values and approach to life, (not to mention meeting a fellow Chai tea drinker).

(Hehe, I’ve just got to pause and realise what I just said… about students of Tai Chi drinking Chai Tea! *ka-snort* I’m so easily amused)!

But for some reason the disdain stuck in my memory and it didn’t feel nice at all. It’s not youth (a far younger kickboxer there was not only very respectful about Tai Chi but had declared earlier that he thinks Tai Chi is really hard), it is more about a lack of understanding and of basic respect. I’ve met experienced kickboxers who have no interest in Tai Chi whatsoever but they nonetheless have a great respect for it, which is really helpful to me for feeling that I still have some sort of value in what I do. Perhaps the ‘ewwww’ person will learn to be respectful, or maybe they won’t. It shouldn’t bother me either way. But it does. And when I cut to the meat of it… it bothers me because I have achieved so much for someone so ill, that I rarely get to go out and see people, that I never thought I’d ever win anything let alone in a sport, that I am aiming for the stars knowing full well that they’re too far away and I don’t have a spacesuit or a long enough ladder. It bothers me because for the first time in many years of ill health I feel like I’m someone in my own right even to some able-bodied people. How daft is that? I’m used to meeting wonderful people who also have conditions they’re dealing with, but I’m not used to healthy people getting close or caring. My Local Friend, who met me since I became disabled but still became my friend anyway, is an exception to what I was beginning to think was a pretty strong ‘rule’ of disabled life. (Big shout out also to all my friends who knew me before I was disabled and yet have weathered the changes and are still my wonderful, beautiful friends now, love you so much, xxx).

Who cares what other people think? Right? We should be the best we can and be proud of everything we achieve. The reason that I am bothered by their attitude is because it taps into my own fears. I am afraid of losing what I have found. Of being dismissed and sidelined again. Of rediscovering that magical form of invisibility that disability can endow.

The answer, of course, is to keep focused on what I love doing. I won’t lose Tai Chi. I might lose the ability to compete in tournaments. I might find that when pitted against more experienced competitors that my natural ability just doesn’t cut it any more against their physical health and training. But I didn’t start learning Tai Chi to do tournaments. I started it to help keep my body from losing function, what I’ve got out of it is so much more. More from the perspective of my health, and more from the perspective of my heart. Don’t get me wrong, I’m still aiming for the stars, and if someone’s got a ladder to lend me and if a spacesuit shows up on Ebay with biddings starting at 99p I’ll be there! I’ve just had a wobble. We all do. But if we hang onto that core of who we are and what we love then who knows where it will take us?

And no matter what happens, I will know that I did what I wanted to do, I followed my dreams as far as I could. Who’d have thought that a chronically ill girl like me with multiple conditions and full-body intractable pain could be someone in sport? It turns out that even when managing endless symptoms throughout each day, once in a while I can manage it well enough to spend 4 or 5 minutes with the able-bodied Tai Chi-ers. That’s surely something to be proud of, no matter what other people think. I wonder if I can be someone at a higher level than beginners? Whatever happens I’m not giving up, and I’ll always have fond memories and tangible reminders…

A gold medal for my physio work :-D

Ladies beginners class, national comp, gold 😀

x

World Tai Chi and QiGong Day

Every year the last Saturday in April is World Tai Chi and QiGong Day. I’ve been a Tai Chi student for just over a year, now, and I have every intention of continuing to learn for as long as I can. I’m not a stereotypical creaky grey-haired person, or a stereotypical young and fit martial-arty type. I’m blending the stereotypes as a young(ish) creaky person and cheering on any person of any age and any ability to give Tai Chi a whirl if they feel the urge!

Like so many people, I have turned to Tai Chi because my health won’t permit other types of exercise. And, like so many other Tai Chi-ers….. I wish I’d started learning it when I was younger!

Yes, Tai Chi is undeniably good for the older body. As we get older our bodies get a bit cranky and need our exercise to be in more appropriate forms and intensity. Tai Chi fits the bill, and research backs it up inexorably.

However, it is also a martial art, (have you seen Jet Li’s Tai Chi Master? 🙂 ), and can be taken to levels beyond what you are aware of from general urban myth. My tutor combines it with Wushu, (that beautiful but exhausting form of martial arts you see spinning through the Eastern martial arts movies), to create beautiful and yet physically demanding forms. If she wore aaaaall her medals at once she’d probably be hidden from view, she’s that good! Tai Chi can be taken as far as you want to take it and, in my opinion, the further you take it the more interesting it gets!

But for us beginners, there is the standard form of 24 moves which we can learn. It is the form practiced throughout the world, but even as a beginner you don’t have to just stop there. You can if you want, of course. The point is that you learn as much as you want to and practice Tai Chi in the way that it makes you most happy. (And it does make us Tai Chi-ers happy)! But the 24 is not the be all and end all. I’m learning the Yang style 88 form at the moment, and loving it, (despite the crazily fast heart-rate and having to sit down half the time coz my blood pressure keeps trying to go for the fainty option). After the 88… I look forward to learning the 42 which includes moves from the various styles of Tai Chi, so I’ll be learning different ways of moving and varying the speed from a Tai-Chi-slow to a fighting-fast and back again. (There’s videos of the 24 form and 42 form on one of my earlier posts here). But I don’t expect to leave the previous forms behind. They all have their place and take different lengths of time to perform, and they all create greater understanding of the art whilst offering new directions to potter off in and learn more.

I love it…..can you tell?  😉

A rare non-wobbling moment caught on camera! (The kicks don’t have to be high ones, by the way, x)

As some of you will already know, I have been trawling the research journals for papers investigating the effects of Tai Chi on health. I wrote about it in my Tai Chi Glee post way back in February. I haven’t forgotten it, but my health, the writing challenge, my health, the lack of adequate tech’ and, er, the main problematic theme: my health, made it really slow going. So I’ve written a bit when I can, researched a bit when I can, and slowly got there over time. And as today is World Tai Chi and QiGong Day, it seemed the most appropriate day to upload it to the blog.

So here it is….the link to my info’ page about the Health Benefits of Tai Chi….just click here.

x

Tai Chi Glee!

Hiya all,

I’ve just been doing some searches for research into the health benefits of Tai Chi…..Wow, there’s plenty of info’ out there! I’ve got copies of loads of research papers, so now I’ve just got to summarise it for my Tai Chi page. Might take a wee while, though! But it’s a comin’!

It’s still blummin’ cold over here at the mo’, and there’s no space indoors for Tai Chi fancy-dress silliness, so I’ll have to wait for some warmer weather to have a chuckle creating those. Meanwhile, I shall continue to wrap up warm and practice the 88 Form, (a Tai Chi form made up of 88 different moves), out in the car park when I can. None of my neighbours have commented worriedly, yet, but they still could, hehe.

I still practice the main 24 form, of course. That’s the form most commonly practiced worldwide. I love it, can’t wait to get round to learning the beautiful 42 form, though.

I know that it sounds like a funny order to learn them in…24, 88…42, but there is a sensible reason, really. The 42 form is a mixture of the various Tai Chi styles, so the idea of being taught the 88 form first is to make sure that we don’t lose what we’ve already learnt specifically in our own style. In my case, I’m learning Yang Style. Then we can go on and learn different versions later on, and hopefully without mucking up our earlier learning. But, oooh, I can’t wait to get onto the 42!

For those of you unfamiliar with Tai Chi, the 42 form is not just slow moves, there are a few fast ones, too. Tai Chi is linked to Kung Fu, so don’t be fooled into thinking it’s all in slow mo’. If you want to see some really fast Tai Chi action then have a movie night-in with Jackie Chan’s ‘Tai Chi Master’. Great fun!

Every move in Tai Chi has a martial arts application. So every placement of a foot, sweep of an arm, angle of a hand, and so on, is specific to what the move represents in fighting terms. Such as blocks, pushes, throws and deflections for example. It helps when learning a move to understand it’s application to see why your wrist shouldn’t be bent, or why your foot only touches the ground with the toes at that moment, and such like.

Tai Chi is a fantastic tool for improving and maintaining health. It can have some pretty major positive effects on health. And aside from all the research currently archived on my laptop, I can also say that from personal experience. 🙂

Obviously, owing to my conditions, I’m a slow-mo’ Tai Chi chick. But I can sure appreciate the fast stuff, and dream of some other dimension where I can do it. 😉

I’ve actually just had a really symptomatic couple of days. So it might seem weird that I can happily natter about Tai Chi, seeing as I found that I couldn’t practice it properly yesterday morning. But the secret of living with CRPS is to keep up the physio’, and the secret of living with dys’ seems to be to shrug my shoulders and try again another day! Next lesson I’ll hopefully be back to ‘normal’ again and be able to retry the slight changes that I was trying to effect today.

My teacher even seems to have got used to my condition, now, too. She said yesterday that she wouldn’t spend time correcting the day’s oddness, coz she knew it was owing to pain and near-fainting symptoms. So she showed me the next move instead, knowing that by next lesson I should be more my usual self again. Finding a good teacher is well worth it, it makes such a difference.

Tai Chi has become a passion of mine, as well as a tool to help me to work around my conditions, so I intend to continue practicing it for maaaany years to come!

Here’s a link to a You Tube demo’ of the 24 form. This video interrupts each move with it’s name, but I thought that if you’re  not familiar with Tai Chi it would give an idea of what constitutes one move…

And if you really fancy it…..here’s a link to a You Tube demo’ of the 42 form, too….

Big hugs to all you lovely folk, hope you’re having a smooth-running day, x