1-10 Pain Scale descriptors for patients and doctors

I damaged my coccyx back in January but I have a pre-existing intractable pain condition (CRPS) so I don’t show how much pain I’m in. It’s a habit that’s developed over the past 18 years of living with severe pain all of the time. Only my boyfriend can clock when the pain is beginning to soar, those of my friends who think they can see when I’m in pain have no idea that by the time they spot it I’m on the verge of inward screaming.

So if my own friends cannot see how much pain I’m in how is a doctor who rarely sees me supposed to comprehend my reported pain levels when they don’t match my outward appearance?

Most practitioners (including pain management teams) will use the 10 point pain scale. But it’s hard to convey what our understanding of that scale is.

When I was first seen by a pain management team aaaall those years ago I was told that a 10 was the worst pain that I could “imagine”. I’m pretty imaginative! And besides I figured that even though I had reached the stage of realising that if someone offered to chainsaw my legs off with no anaesthetic that I would have said ‘yes’ in my desperation I still figured that there must be experiences out there that are even worse than that. So I rated my pain at a 6 when I now know it was a baseline 9 with regular 10s.

When I had completed the maximum allowed NHS pain management treatment time I knew that my baseline pain had reduced a bit so I felt I ‘had’ to rate it less than my starting ‘6’ so I rated it at a 4 when it turns out I was actually getting discharged at a dreadful baseline (i.e. what our pain levels never drop below) of 8. So yeah, the team probably thought they did pretty well and I didn’t know why or how they expected me to be pleased and able to cope/function thereon after. *sigh*

Miscommunication is easy when a scale is subjective.

Being told that a 10 is the worst pain we’ve ever felt doesn’t usually help much either as with a severe 24/7 pain condition the likelihood is that this is the worst pain we’ve ever felt and that just leaves them with a 10 which they often don’t feel is very helpful even though we’ve answered within the parameters.

So… I figured (years later) that I had better find some descriptors for each number on the scale. That way I could share those with my doctor so they could see what pain levels each number represents for me. It makes it easier for them to understand what their patient is actually dealing with so it’s useful input for their assessment.

I collected various descriptors from multiple medical sources and started recording my pain (and other symptoms) in accordance with these. My doctor ended up with several weeks worth represented in one easy-to-assess graph which showed clearly my pain baseline as well as how often and how high the pain spiked (I wrote about that, and first shared my less prettified pain scale descriptors, here). Doctors have a mere few minutes to talk with us so it is helpful to be able to present data in the most accessible way for us to get the most out of an appointment and for them to best be able to understand and help their patient in the time allowed.

It helped me. It helped my doctor.

Especially as my high level intractable pain has been with me so long that I tend not to ‘look’ as bad as I feel. Though after making it to the surgery, through a conversation and then home again I usually find that by heck it shows by then. The doctor doesn’t get to see that bit because we chronically ill have to be at the best we possibly can be to be able to hold a conversation well enough for the meeting to be useful. It is necessary and yet very misleading.

So, here’s my compiled pain scale descriptors in a more user friendly format that when I first wrote about them. I hope that it may prove useful to patients and doctors alike. The reason the compilation is more helpful to me is because when one aspect of it doesn’t pinpoint it well enough another aspect will help me figure out where I am on the scale. Pain interferes with decisions, assessments, pretty much any processing to be honest! So I find that the higher pain level I’m at the less capable I am of accurately placing it on the pain scale. Particularly helpful to me when I’m really bad are the points at which tasks and then concentration get affected – I know that tasks are being affected but when my concentration is being affected it takes longer for me to actually realise that the reason I’m struggling to pinpoint my pain is because… my concentration is being affected!

pain scale 1-10 also a pdf

And here’s a pdf version:
pain scale 1-10

A fellow expert patient and ex-nurse pain blogger, Isy Aweigh, also wrote about the alternative option of personalised pain scales here, which is well worth a look.

Hoping this helps,

With love from me, xx

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Yes I still exist (honest guv’)

Imagine my surprise when I realised I hadn’t written a blog post since the end of last year! Lawks! I’ve been writing drafts when I can but poor ole Betsy the laptop has usually (always) got too many browser tabs open to cope that well! How is it possible that time passes by so quickly these days?!

I have been posting on the Facebook page though of course. Just never seemed to get to complete a blog post. The main reason has been lack of Brain. It pops in now and again but it doesn’t hang around as long as it used to. So I realise I need to change my way of writing to accommodate this change because mostly it’s resulted in me not writing. And as writing has become a love of mine I have been getting twitchy!

As I’m in the UK I was initially dealing with the tail-end of the continuing coldness through the Winter. Always a toughie getting through to the Spring, eh? Pain levels are up, natural vitamin D intake is down, relentlessness is the name of the game and by the end of Winter (well deserving of it’s capital W) we are begging and pleading the weather to bring Spring to us so that we can start recovering.

Winter was actually pretty mild here, but that just means that I wasn’t at quite such an extreme of my wits end, y’know? Winter is *always* hard. Springtime rocks!

I’ve been having some more health issues and I’ll write more about that in due course, but initially it appeared like it was a crazy-arsed allergic reaction to anything / nothing / everything which lasted all the time / 4 random minutes at a time / stopped for a few hours then came back with a vengeance. It was pretty weird. And yes it became apparent that it was so bizarre that it was reminiscent of my respiration issues a few years ago, so I knew it was a systemic overload which had to be stopped. Hence.. more on that in a separate post.

In March I said “yes” to a concert because I figured how could I not? I mean, it was in Winchester Cathedral, maaan! Beautiful! I didn’t realise just how cold it would get in there or that I should’ve dressed for the outdoors to better manage my pain levels, but fortunately they had some doghouse sized radiators to cuddle up to! So yeah, I went and saw Anathema perform acoustically in a gorgeous cathedral. It was stunning. Truly fabulous.

There are a few cathedrals around the UK who raise some of their funds through events like this so if you get the chance… dress warm, take a cushion if you need one, and because it’s acoustic it’s not like you’re gonna get your head blown off by mega-speakers so the volume is more compatible with sensitive ears (though if you’re unsure I can recommend the noise-reduction earplugs as they reduce the volume without muffling the sound).

Winchester Cathedral acoustic concert, Anathema

How stunning is this?!

 

I’ve also had the wonderful experience of two fellow CRPSers travelling from their home countries to come and visit me in real-live-3D, wow! That will also be a separate post because it was so fabulous 😀

Two of my friends got married and Magic Dude and I attended the sci-fi wedding in Star Wars fancy dress. Which I made with my own fair hands, I might add! My sewing machine and I are no longer nemeses, we have made friends and now I wish I had more time during which I am more functional to make some clothes. I now have a new creative project with the sewing machine which I’ll post about soon, too.

And for anyone wondering… I am dressed as Jareal (after the make-up has come off and been re-applied a gazillion times X-) ) who I found out about by researching the comic characters, and Magic Dude is dressed as Plo Koon who was briefly in one of the prequels (very briefly – when asked about his choice of wedding costume he said something like “you see him in one of the spaceships for a moment and then he dies”).

And of course that same month we had the UK government election. Voters were at a loss who to opt for if they even voted at all, many didn’t. The ‘majority’ on our ‘first past the post’ system was a shock. The majority means the party who got the most votes, even though the people who voted for them are actually in the minority of the voting population. Even weirder, our system is set up for the main parties and to keep smaller parties at bay. So this means that votes for the Conservatives adds up to more MPs from their party than exactly the same number of votes would get for another party. I know. Don’t ask. It’s so out of date. Anyway the shock factor was massive. No-one expected the same government to be voted in again. Not even the government peeps themselves! Many of my disabled friends were in tears at the news – welfare cuts have been horrific here with the poorest and most vulnerable getting hit multiple times through different cuts. The new welfare ‘assessment’ process is causing mental health issues to the extent that there have been suicides as a result. Before getting re-elected the government promised a further £12billion welfare cuts so you can see why so many people were in tears. I seemed to last a while in shock until Magic Dude’s Dad said something blinkered and I burst into sobbing and couldn’t stop for some time. The UN is now running a second investigation into the state of human rights in the UK to expand on their earlier investigative report.

So yeah, now I’m an activist. As it turns out. Not just a health activist any more, but an activist for the poor and vulnerable generally. I can’t do much in my state of ill-health but there are petitions I can sign, ideas I can bounce, people I can help. Being chronically ill isn’t going to stop me from caring about others and doing what I can to help reduce the additional shitstorms coming their way. Takes up quite a bit of Brain Time of course, another reason I have been so absent from the blogging as usually May is the time of year when I would begin to manage to write a bit more.

So anyway that’s enough for the body to have to handle whilst still working through the months slowly recovering from Winter, right?

But I’ve also been doing my usual full-on overdoing it for one day in April and one day in June at Tai Chi tournaments. As you know it takes months for me to recover from Winter and weeks to recover from each tournament, so the overlap of tournament with Not Recovered From Winter Yet is substantial. But I do it because I am so limited and restricted every day that pushing myself for two days per year feels worth it because although the aftermath is horrific the memories last far longer. 🙂

The April tournament this year was not the usual nationals in Oxford but my first ever Europeans. (The Europeans were originally going to be held in Latvia and so this was a last minute alternative and much more viable for me to get to).

I performed the Sun Style 73 form which is not a flowery style so I have to show my understanding and skill levels in different subtle ways, so that was my challenge. I also performed the 42 form (a tournament form incorporating 5 different styles of Tai Chi) so performing two different things at one tournament was also my challenge. I was a bit awed that my teacher had put me in the advanced/open section whilst I am still officially at intermediate level, I guess that was also my challenge. Hey wait a minute? How many challenges am I fool enough to take on at once here?!

I was amazed that I ended up with a silver for my 42 form (with two lovely ladies from the Netherlands either side of me with gold and bronze) and a good score for my first ever tournament performance of Sun. But more fabulous was the fact that this was the first time that I’d been part of a larger team. We’ve only had a maximum of 3 of us there before, but this time we had a whole gaggle of us. Some in beginner, some in intermediate and some in the over 55s. Everybody in the team was supportive and encouraging to each other, and lots of fellow Tai Chi-ers there were positive towards us too. In fact I was so pleased to find out that my teacher had been told that her team were notable for their friendliness and positive attitudes. What a fabulous endorsement for her first event managing a larger team. 😀

Tai Chi, 2015, European silver

The next day I met up with my lovely teammate who also has chronic pain and was staying in the same hotel. We have travelled our Tai Chi paths alongside each other these past four-ish years and we have cheered on each other’s progression with such joy because it’s one heck of an achievement in the face of our respective health issues. I hobbled from bed to lift, and from lift to comfy chair in the hotel lobby. I sat in one chair with my feet up on a second, had my hot water bottle under my legs, blanket over the top, painkillers in my bag and he had been his usual sweetheart self and got the coffees before I got there. Several hours later we were still there nattering away. Movement was not very viable for either of us and it was great to be company for each other through the pain levels.

My lovely Magic Dude turned up later with the wheelchair so that he could get me out of the hotel room the following day. We went into Oxford town and I went camera crazy as I always do when I actually get out somewhere! It was really lovely to get to see the city this year. That wheelchair makes such a difference! 😀

Oxford, bicycles.jpg

Pictures obviously included bicycles (and many many grotesques and gargoyles on the old buildings)….

Oxford, Bodleian library

…the inspiration for Hogwarts main school hall in the films (Bodleian Library)…

Oxford, street pianist

…and a pianist on wheels who was super-prepared for any sudden change in the weather! Totally normal, nuthin to see here! (Actually his piano playing was gorgeous).

The weeks between the Europeans and the June Nationals whizzed by and I was not in great shape healthwise (starting the tournament day with the screaming ouchies in my left leg at a mean 8.5/10, boo!) but I managed to get the pain levels down a bit to perform in Sun Style at my intermediate level and got a good score considering I was racing through the 5-6 minute form to complete it within the required 4 minutes *and* I added in an extra move by accident, too! X-) Being able to get a decent score with Sun style was my aim. And extra wonderful was that my teammate (yes, that same friend) got the exact same score for his multiple-style 42 form and so we ended up on the podium together with joint silver, wow! I can’t tell you how awesome it felt to be standing there with my friend sharing that achievement after coming such a long way together in our journey to help our health situations. There really are no words to describe the singing glee in the soul but it was flipping wonderful! He’s put in phenomenal work to get where he is today using both physical and psychological tools to find the best pathway round the health stuff. If anyone deserved to be standing on that podium it was him, and I found myself standing on the same podium with him which felt so perfect that I wasn’t on a different podium or even a different level – we were on there together. Go Team!

I also entered the advanced/open section with the 42 form, managed to fluff it up in amazing style, made it look like it was meant to be that short honest guv’, and ended my performance somewhat (a lot) earlier than I should have, har! A good score considering the extent of my very silly error, and some wonderfully positive words from head judge Faye Yip telling me to come back next year because I have “potential”, yay!

Oh and no wonder my body has been so screwed because the classes that I use for physio’ include adaptive Kung Fu in which I have got my red sash and first level brown sash this year too. I’m not entirely sure how I managed to achieve those! Although the brown grading was during the heatwave and my legs were glad of it even if my nervous system wasn’t! My body needs more tiiiiiime, man!

And yet I posted on my personal Fbk wall the other day that it would be nice not to have to deal with people telling me that I am “lucky” to “not have to work” / “get to stay at home all day” because I get those sort of comments as a result of how people see me when I am out of the house i.e. looking ‘normal’ because I am doing my physio’. If only they could see me the rest of the day eh? Needing a wee and not being able to get to the loo in the adjacent room, wanting a cuppa and having to wait several hours til Magic Dude gets home and can make me one. Ah well, people just don’t get it eh?! 😛

And then we were getting the house ready to put up for sale. It sold at the end of July and we’ve been searching for our new home ever since. Not sure how much longer our buyers will hang in there but if they pull out it’ll sell straight away again. The market here at the moment for the main price bracket of £120-210k (your basic 2-3 bed homes with the usual squished space that we have in UK houses) is basically at about 15 buyers per house. Apparently we wouldn’t have the same extent of trouble if we had £210-250k. Oh if only eh?! Har, dream on!

We need some more space y’see. I moved into his one bedroom place and so nearly everything I own has been in the loft for the last 5 years. If one of us wants to do something creative there’s no space to set it up and leave it so most of my physio’ time is taken up with getting everything out and setting it up and then putting it all away again afterwards which doesn’t leave much time for whatever the activity in the middle was supposed to be (I want to get painting again). So yes we need a little more space but also….an enclosed garden. Currently we only have an open outdoor space between the house and the pavement out the front. Apart from how nice it would be to have some private space the main reason is (dahn-da-da-daaaaah…) we wanna get a dog! But the housing market is slowing down for chrimble so I’m expecting our buyers to pull out sometime soonish and that we’ll be re-selling in January when potential new homes start to show up in greater numbers.

So with fewer house viewings taking up my physio’s I finally have some time again, wheeee! Except for how that creative project I mentioned will now take over any available physio’ time. I look forward to sharing that when all the material has arrived. 🙂

Anyway, now you know I’m still here.

Phew! That was a heck of a catch-up!

Loves xx

It’s health activist nominations time!

Yes, it’s that time of year again. It’s time for the third annual health activist awards when we get to vote for all of our fave health activists / bloggers out there who have made a difference to us patients. 😀

wego-health 2013

I’ve been happily voting for bloggers, it’s so fab’ to get to share the love 😀

All you need to do is follow the link here and add the weblog (or Twitter or Facebook information depending on where they write and post), and click on the award that you are nominating them for. You can do so anonymously if you prefer. When asked for the nominee’s contact info’.. an email, Facebook page or Twitter account are all ways for WEGO to let them know that they’ve been nominated.

Of course if you want to vote for little ole me I would not complain! 😉 In fact some of you must’ve been busy as WEGO Health have informed me that I have been nominated for three awards…. wheeeeee!

You can ‘endorse’ me on my nomination page if ya like. Only one of the awards I’ve been nominated for is showing on there at the moment, though, so here’s the relevant prettification for this post…

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I started by nominating someone for a health geekery award! There’s one blogger who ‘geeks out’ at research even more than I do so I just had to get in there and vote, hehe Go on, share the love people! 😀

x

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An informal international network of CRPS patients

When we find ourselves diagnosed with something we’ve never heard of and our doctor seems to be unable to clearly explain what on earth it is, what do we do? Many of us turn to the internet, but health information online is of variable quality, and even more so when research bounds onwards in new understandings whilst many websites are not updated with this new information.

So what do we do then? Who out there has heard of the condition and has some clue about symptoms, prognosis, the whys and wherefores? How many of us actually get to see a specialist in CRPS? I was diagnosed by a very good limb-reconstruction specialist, and I’ve seen some general pain management teams, but never a CRPS specialist.

Another reason we may look online is for someone, anyone, who understands what we are going through, who can reassure us that we’re okay, that’s it’s not ‘all in our heads‘, and that the sorts of stresses and strains which we are experiencing are common for other patients too.

Tai Chi holding planet earth, the world

Of course the nature of the internet means that geographical boundaries no longer restrict who we meet or how far good information can be shared. There is effectively an informal international support network of CRPS patients all helping and supporting each other. And for those of us who find the right groups for our needs and temperament, and the most useful pages with correct contemporary medical information, the effects on us can be positively life-changing.

The impact that this has is that a large number of patients internationally who were previously often isolated and looking for information…. now have access to regular contact and support, and can find research, discuss aspects of the condition, talk about potential treatments and indeed anything that they wish to talk about.

This is one heck of a turnaraound for patient experience.

Heart ornament

An ornament on my mantlepiece from one of my beloved international friends, x

I have met some awesome fellow CRPSers who admin’ in support groups, raise awareness, blog and info’-share as advocates for fellow patients. The slower speed we have to work at owing to our health issues never detracts from my excitement at the potential though. How can I not be excited? – I am part of an informal network of CRPS patients who have professional skills in nursing, pharmacology, occupational therapy, alternative medicine (which is especially important to patients allergic to mainstream medicine), nutrition, research, writing, psychology, counselling, ohhhh my goodness this network of awesome and beautiful-souled people is an absolute treasure trove!

We gravitated towards one another because we recognise each other as determined information-gathering/sharing advocates. There’s no formalities here, we’re just people who got to know each other, liked what we found in each other and we often come together to help others.

Some of the people in the network work hard at raising awareness, sometimes that is through social media, or wider media, or through creating and selling awareness jewellery. Others in the network blog and maintain websites. Some carry out research, and others support that research (sending another moment of thanks to my super-coder, who is a CRPS carer, and to my fab’ coding and statistics advisor 🙂 ). Pretty much all of us are involved in admin’ support alongside the other things we do.

One day I might even dare to go purple, too!

Pause for a moment to remember that these people are so terribly chronically ill, with multiple issues across various systems in their bodies. They often are unable to work because they cannot guarantee being able to work at any given time on any given day. So all this wonderful work they do to help others is done around immense pain and often additional challenging issues such as fainting, severe nausea, the understated brain fog (which one of my friends refers to as full-on London brain smog when it gets so bad that we can’t function!) and this means that it can only be done as and when the body allows. Which isn’t very much. So the amount of time that they battle through the symptoms to even just be there for others says a lot about how much it means to them to be able to help fellow patients.

These are truly awesome people.

And they just so happen to be from all over the world.

Here we are, all over the world but in contact at the click of a button. Magic!

Modern technology, including the rather handy online translating applications, renders geographical distance a mere annoyance. In fact it’s not so much the network of advocacy which is affected, because that works amazingly across time zones, across language barriers, across cultures and more. No it’s really just the fact that we can’t all meet up for teas, coffees and a face-to-face natter that really bugs us about the geographical distance!

The world appears to have shrunk since I met you all! Other countries now feel like they’re ‘just over there’ instead of a whole world away! It’s a wonderful feeling that we are all coming together like this. My own personal world is very much better for you all being in it. Thank-you, x

The love, the gratitude, the admiration, the respect that I feel for these amazing people is something that lifts me on those days where the health issues are more challenging than usual. They’re out there. Kicking CRPS arse! Making a difference to other patients around the world. And when they’re facing a flare-up day they know that I’m still out there doing what I can, too.

The international aspect is a positive boon as the varying time zones (plus all of us who can’t get to sleep!) means that there’s always people out there.. 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, who support, share information and answer questions – who do whatever they can to help fellow patients online.

International post, my initial network

My initial mini network of international friends. We still get together for natters on Skype and regularly communicate in group chats online, these are some of my bestest buds 🙂

Initially I was just me doing what I could to help others. Then I met some fellow patients doing the same and I became part of a group of friends doing what we could to be useful. And as time passes the connections naturally build up. We meet other admin’s during our admin’ roles, we come across other bloggers and awareness raisers when we join in with various photo or writing challenges… and so the network keeps growing. Think of all the little networks, and imagine each network having someone who meets an advocate from another informal network… they get to know each other, and maybe some others in each of their networks do to, and before we know it the network has extended.

I adore the advocates I’ve met, we have the same goal in our heart: to help others. That one thing says a lot about our personalities.. so it’s not surprising that we help each other rather than butting heads! This isn’t business, this is heart, and morals, and ethics, and love. And that crosses international divides without missing a beat. The common denominator is helping others, it’s about being human, about caring. And that steps past any differences that we might have in geographical location, or culture, or the type of healthcare system we have in our country, or even language.

Our hearts are aligned, and we put our heads together to be as helpful as we can.

Every one is a lovely caring soul who I am honoured to know.

And if you think gentle souls can’t be determined then think again, because this is a network of CRPS survivors, many for more than a decade already, so we’re more like a group of cupcake baking, fairy-winged terminators! 😉

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Other bloggers in the network posting today, too…

Yes this very day, the 22nd November 2013 🙂 , some of the bloggers in this informal international network are also writing a blog post on the same theme and we’re all posting to our blogs on the same day. 😀 As each of them post their own articles online I shall add the links below for you. As we are in various time zones and working round health stuff the links will become available at different times so I’ll keep popping in to add more links as they become available, x

Union Jack cup and saucer, full

Representing my fellow patients in the unofficial UK branch 😉

And rather than leave this post solely with UK input from me… there are some quotes below from some wonderful CRPS patients in other countries who wrote a bit to be included in this post between their high pain levels and all the usual deadlines and pressures of everyday life – thank-you to everyone listed below, x 🙂

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Other blog posts on the same theme being posted today…

Sylvie in Belgium: Blog SDRC International: des amis merveilleux et des patients experts / CRPS international blog post : wonderful friends and experts patients
Written in both French *and* English, how amazing is this lady?! 😀

Lili in Canada: Love Knows No Bounds

Jo in the UK: CRPS Awareness Month International Blog Post, A Community of Angels 

Christa in the USA: Support of International Community: Why Do We Need It? 
Christa, with RSD/CRPS Doesn’t Own Me, has also teamed up with the RSDSA this CRPS awareness month to raise awareness and also to raise funds for USA patients in need of financial assistance with daily needs, medical equipment and medical costs via the RSDSA Patient Assistance Fund in Honor of Brad Jenkins

Isy in the USA: International group post: Love is portable 

Sarah in the USA: currently multi-tasking, like the superhero that she is, having a Tilt Table Test today. Rest up hon, hope the results are helpful, xx

Suzanne in the USA: Dancing Through The Fire… AND… You’re Gonna Hear “US” Roar! *an International Affair*
Suzy is also raising money for American RSD Hope, for every dollar donated your name goes into a raffle to win her handcrafted CRPS awareness bracelet. You can see more on her Facebook page and her website
And here’s the wonderful American Sign Language accompaniment to Katy Perry’s song that Suzy referred to in her blog post:

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We may well ‘network blog’ on the same day like this again because we all enjoyed getting together to plan this trial run (by the way, we co-ordinated through Facebook, just in case you’re on there 😉 ), so if you’re a CRPS blogger and fancy joining in just drop one of us a line 😀

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Some input from CRPS friends outside the UK:

“Having CRPS can be very isolating, and when you are living in a small populated country like Iceland that can be isolating too. And when you have a rare disease in a small populated country you are not going to meet many people with same disease that you can share your experience with. So meeting people all over the world online and making wonderful friends has really made this CRPS struggle worth it all. My friends all have different experiences, have had different treatments and can share their experience and knowledge. When you are having a hard time then nothing is better than a Skype meeting with friends or a chat on Facebook. Different background, different culture, different country and different treatment can only bring more to the table and give you good advice. I don´t know where I would be at the moment without the social network, it has been the most helpful thing in my CRPS battle, at times more helpful than any doctor, making my battle bearable and it has kept me going.”

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“To be part of CRPS groups on the Internet is really helpful for me. After I got diagnosed the doctors here left me alone. No explanations, no help, nothing. Then met all this CRPS warriors online. They helped me through the first time which was really rough. And I know without them I’ve never could have done it. I had so many questions and they’ve been there for me till now. We’re a group. We’re there for each other. I love it. Whenever I need someone who really does understand me I can go to the group and talk to them. They know what I’m going through. I got my stepfamily who are supporting me but they don’t know what I’m going through because they are not experiencing it. But these warriors, they know it. They’re in it too. When I’m talking about my blackouts, my flares. They know what I’m talking about. I don’t have to explain everything. And I met wonderful people there. Even my best friend! I love her! I visited her. Which was wonderful. It showed me that I’m still able to travel even though I payed a big price for it afterwards. But all these friends I met there….I don’t want to miss any of them ever again! I’m not alone anymore!”

                                                                                              –  Noei, Switzerland

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“I am a Scottish woman, who has lived in The Netherlands for 14 years now. I have two amazing little girls, 7 and 8 years old. I am married to an amazing Dutch man (for 13 years now).

October 2010 at work a colleague pulled my chair for under my bottom. Which caused the tendon in my wrist to become detached. I had surgery soon after. However RSD/CRPS had already started.

I have RSD/CRPS type 2 – I have severe nerve damage from the elbow down to my finger tips in my right arm. The nerve damage caused my arm to decompose in 9 areas and has also caused me to spend 12.5 weeks in hospital in 2013 so far. This has an emotional effect on the whole family and friends.

RSD/CRPS is an everyday struggle I have never had pain below a 6/10 in 3 years. This is also due to the fact that I have rebound effect with almost all medicine for RSD/CRPS. I forget most things, I have lists all around my home for nearly everything, I used to have an amazing memory. I have at one point this year spent 2-3 months crying daily, not due to pain but grief over the loss of my life.

Around January 2013 my husband knew I needed more than my own friends and family and pain doctors, I needed to find others with RSD/CRPS who could understand me. I joined an online support group via Facebook, I can say with all honesty the group on one occasion saved my life and on countless occasions help me through the hard times caused by pain. I have made many friends who are also people with RSD/CRPS. We laugh together, cry together and also learn to express what no other person can understand, the emotional and physical pain connected with RSD/CRPS. I have spent time on Skype with others which is amazing, not just because typing is hard but seeing someone helps so much more than typing a message to them.

Without an international community of people with this pain syndrome I would be isolated still, alone, and so would many others. Thank you to you all, you are all strong, amazing, courageous people.

I hope pain management teams can read this blog and reach out to us all. Together we can fight this RSD/CRPS. However alone I feel we may keep struggling, both Doctors and patients.”

.                                                                                             – Joni, Netherlands

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“Useful Links” page for fellow patients

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For extra info’ and resources to help us improve our self-advocacy I have a Useful Links page. It includes links for research papers to show doctors, information to share with family and friends, organisations to contact for more information, wallet cards, autonomic physicians list, and more.

I will continue to add to this page over time. If there is anything that you would like to see added or any suggestions for links that could be helpful to other patients then let me know as I want this page to grow so that it can be as useful as possible.

Much love to you all from me,

x

Useful Links page

WEGO Health Activist Nominations

Oh my, oh my, oh my, oh myyyyyyy! I’d been contacted by WEGO Health to let me know that I’ve been nominated for the Rookie of the Year Award a wee while ago, but today I opened up my emails to find several messages from WEGO about nominations for three other awards as well and I am currently still on a floaty cloud of happy surprise!

Thank-you lovely readers for being so kind as to nominate me for several awards for WEGO’s 2012 Health Activist Awards. I am totally blown away by your kindness and your ever wonderful and heart-warming support. I cannot find the words to describe being transported from a morning of tired slogging through my rather bland porridge (I think my tastebuds may have got used to me accidentally tipping far too much cinnamon on, my hands were less wobbly today and my tastebuds were rather sorry about that!) to “Wheeeeeeeee! Oh good grief! How blummin’ lovely are theeeeey?” *wibble*

I have now been informed that not only have you nominated me for 2012 Rookie of the Year, but also for 2012 Health Activist Hero, 2012 Unsung Hero and 2012 Hilarious Health Activist! Wow! I’m totally blown away! Thank-you so much, I am challenged to find the words to adequately express my feelings as I’m still in a state of happy surprise! (With my ANS it’ll take a while for the wibbles to settle down, too, so I may as well go with it and grin like an idiot for a few hours, eh?)!

I want to say to keep voting for your fave health activists online because there are some truly amazing people that I’ve met out here in the online ‘cloud’, but the voting closed on December the 31st and so now it’s over to the WEGO Health judges to get some mega-reading in. Lawks, they’re gonna be busy! There are some amazing bloggers out there and I salute them all. I’ve met wonderful fellow bloggers and fellow patients since starting this blog and there are no words to adequately express the strength, love and beauty that is apparent in your words and actions online. I am honoured to be counted among you and I adore the support and sharing online that helps so very many patients living with a massive variety of health conditions. Each and every individual doing this makes a positive difference and has priceless value because of it, xxx

2012 WEGO Nominations