It’s not all in your head!

There are two parts to today’s post again.

WEGO’s health blog challenge: “What’s the most ridiculous thing you’ve heard about your health condition?…”

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The most ridiculous thing I’ve heard about my health condition(s) is the shuddersome concept of… “it’s all in your head”!

Yep, we really get told this in some appointments. Sometimes it’s merely a medical practitioner trying to explain autonomic pain amplification and doing it reaally badly! But often it really is as extreme as it sounds – genuine physiological symptoms get written off as psychologically founded.

Fortunately there is oodles of research these days about how psychological effects in the kind of conditions that I have are often caused by living with the condition itself. So we have plenty of research papers to back us up, the only problem is that we have to be the ones to find and share this research because non-specialist medical staff have often not come across them. (See my ‘What is CRPS?‘ page for some handy research paper references, and the explanation about interpreting anxiety symptoms wrongly applies to Dysautonomia patients, too).

It is important for our doctors to remember that an understandable reaction to chronic health does not necessarily mean mental health issues. We should not have to hide when we are struggling owing to fear of getting mislabelled.

Of course health conditions and mental health issues are not mutually exclusive: it is entirely possible for them to co-exist. This is not an black and white area, shades of grey are the norm, but even without any mental health issues at all patients with chronic health issues should still be supported both physically and mentally for the simple fact that severe long-term health problems are, at the very least, very challenging in the life changes they effect. It is an important part of living with a chronic condition to be able to find ways to keep going, to find new meanings, new value in ourselves, new ways of living and of finding joy in life. With the addition of some handy psychological tools we are much better equipped to handle our situation.

I’ve heard the “it’s all in your head” idea many times. I’m a veteran of appointments where it turns out that I know more than the practitioner, as do many of us with specialist conditions. I have the scientific info’ to undermine their erroneous comment in the sweetest most helpful-patient kinda way! 😉 (feel free to add a comedy evil laugh here!) Ohhhh yes, get in the know peoples, doctors like data so data them towards the corrected viewpoint! Most doctors just haven’t considered the possibility that a faulty ANS can cause anxiety symptoms without any pre-existing anxiety, but once you point it out it makes perfect sense to them. It’s just showing them the alternate angle that they have to think from because our conditions don’t fit neatly into the main themes of medical diagnosis. They check out the organs and do blood tests for normal stuff but everything comes back negative so they think “there’s nothing actually wrong with them… it must be psychological”. But what they are forgetting (because it is not something taught as part of main medical training) is that if it’s not the organs… could it be the wiring between them? They need to run different tests to find out.

The trouble is, of course, that we tend to learn this kind of helpful knowledge retrospectively. Years after we were told it was all in our heads, years after we cried for the lack of support from a doctor when all we wanted to do was be able to get on with our lives, years after those around us doubted that there was anything wrong with us because our doctors didn’t think there was. Years later we find out why the doctors made that error, and we try to pay it forward by sharing the knowledge with our fellow patients who are still early on in their journey. To try and help them avoid the pointless pain and waiting that we had to go through simply because doctors only conducted the usual tests and the negative results falsely led them to think that it was “all in our heads”.

Photo challenge #6 – “…something you let go because of CRPS/RSD”

Clinical Psychology2 (2)

(source)

I was retraining for a career when I had to give up work. I studied for the required degree in my own time whilst working full-time, (thank-you Open University 😀 ), but before I had completed it I had to give up work. I carried on, graduated, then started my masters degree. I did not realise I would never be able to work or study full-time. My choice of career is no longer viable. But my training was in psychology and in research, my intention was to complete the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology so that I could study the post-doctoral training in Neuropsychology. My aim: to help inform and support patients with head injuries as well as their families.

Losing that future was devastating, but it looks like I have ended up with some pretty useful skills to make myself handy to my fellow patients. Letting go of the career I had worked so hard towards was horrible, but I’m on a different path now, and I can do a lot of good on this one as well, x

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4 thoughts on “It’s not all in your head!

  1. Or, as my dad used to say “Just because it is all in my head doesn’t mean its not real’. He suffered from thyroid cancer and rheumatoid arthritis for all his adult life, both were iatrogenic.

  2. Pingback: An informal international network of CRPS patients | Elle and the Auto Gnome

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