Olympic torch relay comes to an end

Today the Olympic torch finishes up its journey with the lighting of the cauldron in the main stadium. Many worthy people have carried it on its journey, some of whom I have mentioned along the way. Some fellow patients slipped under the radar on this blog as their conditions were not mentioned online. But whatever the reasons for a torchbearer being nominated, it is always glorious to see such wonderful examples of our fellow humans doing good, and shining some light upon the world. (In the case of the torch, I guess that’s quite literally shining light, too)! They lift our hearts and make the world a more beautiful place.

One fellow patient who slipped under my radar was Nicola Blythe, who carried the torch in Carrickfergus in Northern Ireland on the 3rd June. (Yes, Nicola, you do not escape a mention, tee hee 😉 ) A lovely friend of Nicola’s told me of her inspirational qualities which led her to be nominated to be part of the Olympic proceedings. Volunteering as a co-ordinator to enable disabled individuals of all ages to get sailing, Nicola is a crucial and hard-working member of the team. So much so that the nomination came from the Honourary Secretary of Belfast Lough Sailability, which made me grin even more. Fantastic stuff from a fellow CRPS patient who first and foremost is themselves rather than a condition, and who also chooses to help others have some fabulous experiences. 😀

After all that relay jogging around the UK we await the opening ceremony with mixed excitement and intrigue. After all… countryside animals, fake rain clouds (in case it doesn’t actually rain), pseudo music festivals and a hoard of NHS nurses does sound rather intriguing!

Huge cheer to all of the torchbearers, I am glad that you got to participate and create some amazing memories. And also much love and big hugs to all of those out there who were not able to get involved, but who are shining lights in the world where ever you happen to be, xx

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2 thoughts on “Olympic torch relay comes to an end

  1. I’m a sailor… Learned in my early 20s, in an adventure so harrowing that I avoided the sport for 20 years. (It takes a lot to scare me off.) Then, after a few years of CRPS, getting tired of “I can’t”, I came across the Bay Area Association of Disabled Sailors, and learned – again – to sail, this time from a blind man. I wound up living on my own sailboat for six years, a form of constant, gentle physio which had a lot to do with my staying as well and strong as I did.

    I’m particularly glad you mentioned Nicole. She now has a special place in my heart, and if I ever get my dream of a sailing trip around Ireland, I will certainly pay her a visit 🙂

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